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Encrypted communication has entered the mainstream, with consumer apps like iMessage and WhatsApp offering encryption by default. Even Facebook Messenger offers end-to-end encryption if you’re willing to dig through its menus.But encryption is just a small piece of keeping messages safe. It protects correspondence from would-be digital eavesdroppers, but it won’t do much good if a device is lost or stolen. And encrypted messaging won’t shield data from deliberate leaks by employees.Vaporstream lets companies protect their data with ephemeral messaging. Think Snapchat, but for corporate communications. But since companies are required bySEE DETAILS
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Financial Services

In March 2017 the nation’s first cybersecurity regulation became law imposing strict cybersecurity measures on financial institutions operating in New York. The new rules specify everything from naming a Chief Information Security Officer, to risk assessments, event notification, encryption, penetration and vulnerability testing, training and monitoring and audit logs.

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Healthcare

Quick – when was the last time you used your smartphone to investigate a health issue? If you are like most people you are probably a “connected patient” using smart devices to take more ownership of your health. A 2015 Pew Research Center (PEW) report shows 62% of smartphone owners use their phone to look up information about a health condition. And many of us now also use our smartphones to correspond with providers.

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Healthcare

Communication and effective collaboration within the healthcare industry is not always as easy as it should be. Care teams – from doctors and nurses to the patients and their caregivers – need the ability to communicate efficiently, effectively, privately and securely to ensure the highest level of service. Unfortunately, this is an ongoing challenge, particularly when it comes to long term and home based healthcare.

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Secure Messaging

“Whoever Wins the White House, This Year’s Big Loser is Email.” Thus, reads the headline in the NY Times on October 19, 2016. Indeed, in the current election cycle, month after month, the focus has been on hacked and released emails, on disappearing emails, on emails that reappear on various devices – not of the user’s choosing. It certainly seems that the people who sent those emails should have known better than to write what they actually wrote in the first place.

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